Landscaping to Improve Resale: 9 Projects That Fit Within Your Desired Price Point

WRITTEN BY DANIEL M. CHRISTENSEN

Landscaping to Improve Resale: 9 Projects That Fit Within Your Desired Price Point

As the weather starts to heat up each Spring, so too does the housing market. Spring is an optimal time to get your house ready to sell. The first thing that potential buyers will see of your home is the landscaping, so make a great first impression with beautiful outdoor spaces. An investment in landscaping can help sell your home faster and for more money. There are simple projects at every price point that can help you achieve great curb-appeal.

Inexpensive $

1. Keep the Lawn Well-Manicured

The easiest and most obvious landscape project when hoping to sell your home is to get your lawn looking its best. Spring is a great season to try to sell because your lawn is helped by Mother Nature. Wet, mild Spring weather will help the lawn stay green with less effort. To show off that green lawn, make sure to mow and edge it often.

2. Keep Your Yard Weed Free

It may not cost much, but it will require some time and effort to control the weeds around your property. Spray or pull weeds in flowerbeds, on property borders, and along the driveway. A weed-free yard will help potential buyers feel confident that the home is well cared for, which can create an overall positive impression of your home.

3. Add Flower Pots Near Your Front Door

A splash of color in the yard is a great way to highlight your home. If you are looking to sell quickly, it might be too late to do major yard improvements since new flowers and plants will not have adequate time to grow and mature, but a few beautiful pots of flowers strategically placed near your front door can have a similar effect without requiring a lot of time and maintenance.

Moderate $$

4. Add Outdoor lighting

Outdoor lighting has become a trendy feature that buyers have embraced. Lighting can add interest to your yard, highlight areas of beautiful landscaping, and make your home stand out at all times of the day. Solar lights are particularly easy to use because they will recharge during the day and automatically come on in the evening to illuminate your home.

5. Install Curbing/Edging

If you have a little extra money to spend, consider adding curbing or edging around your yard. It helps the landscaping appear crisp and clean, and makes the lawn easier to mow and trim. Savvy buyers will appreciate the ease of maintenance and the defined spaces that curbing creates.

6. Hire a Lawn or Pest Control Company

It is important when selling a home to make sure that their aren’t any obvious problems. If your lawn is dead or patchy or you have pest problems like spiders, mice, etc, you will need to get those under control. Some of these projects are beyond the scope of what an individual without training can quickly achieve and should be left to professionals. Lawn care companies and exterminators can assess the issues you may have and recommend treatments. This may even be limited to a one time visit that can quickly improve the chances of selling your home.

High-End $$$

7. Create Outdoor Living Areas

If you have money to invest in your home, high-end landscaping projects can increase your bottom-line and draw attention from buyers looking for upgrades. Extra living area outside of your home is a huge attention grabber that attracts buyers. This could range from simple patios staged with outdoor furniture, to screened in porches, to full outdoor kitchen areas. Depending on your location, these upgrades may or may not be worth the investment, so do your research before proceeding.


8. Replace or Update Fencing

Fences provide a safe place for children and pets and also give homeowners a feeling of privacy, so they are highly sought after. Fencing is also one of the first things people see when coming to your home. If your fence is an eyesore, it will be worth it to make the effort to have it replaced or fixed up. A new fence is quite an investment, so first determine if your fence can be spruced up with some nails and a new coat of paint.

9. Hire a Professional Landscaper

If you are serious about creating a stunning yard, a professional landscaper can add massive amounts of curb appeal to make your home one of a kind. A landscaper can help you add impressive things like paving stone walkways, decorative retaining walls, and water features. Outdoor improvements definitely increase house values, but it is always good to know what the market will support in your area before moving forward.

No matter how much money you have to invest in your home’s landscaping, there are projects you can do this Spring to improve your home’s curb appeal and get it noticed by buyers.

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10 SUSTAINABLE FEATURES THAT ARE CHANGING THE DEFINITION OF SMART HOUSE

Written By   Elle Decor

“Smart home” and “green home” are now nearly synonymous.

smart house

With the recent sale of “Real Housewife” Shannon Beador’s über-eco-friendly Orange County mansion, it’s clearer than ever that selling a home is about more than just a prime location and pretty paint colors. Being green is a major selling point, too.

Beador’s estate came with seriously impressive features like organic wallpaper, allergen-free floors, buried crystals and hospital grade air. Super neat, but not exactly mainstream. That got us wondering: What other fascinating green features may we be missing out on?

To find out, we researched the latest green home trends, and spoke with Sabine H. Schoenberg, host of “Sabine’s New House” and the designer behind what’s been dubbed the “smart house of the future” — an incredibly sustainable home that was just built in Greenwich, Connecticut.

Read on for the savvy technology that you probably never thought about, and snag some of that green living for yourself.

Energy Conservation

The sustainable smart house in Greenwich, Connecticut, designed by Sabine H. Schoenberg.

The Greenwich house has roots that are planted deep — 450 feet, to be exact. Two loops extend far into the ground as part of a geothermal system, extracting the constant heat of the earth to heat the space.

“We used a geothermal system for heating and cooling,” says Schoenberg. “It is controlled by a specialized computer that optimizes production and output control, only producing the energy needed for the home at just the right times.”

Geothermal pumps use 25 percent to 50 percent less electricity than conventional systems, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. That equates to an energy bill that is about 40 percent of a conventionally-run house’s bill, says Sabine. Plus, since there are no outside condensing units, like an air conditioner, you don’t have to worry about air pollution.

For pinpointing the temperature of the indoor spaces, Schoenberg turned to smart thermostats, which learn a homeowner’s patterns (like when they’re home and when they’re away) and adjusts heating and cooling accordingly — typically within just two weeks.

“In terms of energy efficiency, smart thermostats are a must,” says Schoenberg. “They tailor temperature settings to homeowners’ individual comfort settings when they are actually at home and reduce energy consumption when they are away.”

There are two types of smart thermostats that can do this: A geosensing thermostat (like the Lyric T5 Wi-Fi Thermostat) that detects the presence of your phone, assuming it’s always on you. The other type is a motion-detecting thermostat like the Nest Thermostat, which you can actually program to serve as a motion detector, too.

Water Conservation

water conservation

Recent droughts across the United States have turned water conservation from a pleasant thought into a necessity. Even if the law isn’t cracking down on your water use, there are a few cutting edge, water-conserving features that can help you save money and do something nice for Mother Nature.

The Greenwich house, for example, has a smart irrigation system controlled by the Rachio smart irrigation controller ($250), which allows for tailored watering.

“Out are the old irrigation systems where you have to set up certain zones, times and lengths of watering, or rain sensors that only know when it’s already rained,” says Schoenberg. “The smart irrigation system fine-tunes its watering to the amount of light and soil condition at each of its 16 zones, and responds to the local weather forecast, even before it rains.”

irrigation system

This system guarantees savings of nearly 40 percent on water usage.

Inside, you can watch your water consumption by installing a smart showerhead, such as the Hydrao, which just debuted at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) this year. The showerhead connects to an iPhone or iPad app so you can set alerts in intervals (think five gallons, seven gallons or 10 gallons).

smart showered

As you reach each interval, LED lights illuminate in various colors to remind you how much water you’ve used. The lights are operated by a tiny turbine that uses the running water to supply electricity. You can pre-register now for the showerhead to be the first to know when it hits the market.

Solar Power

Solar panels aren’t possible for everyone, based on budget, time and regional climate. There are little ways, however, to incorporate efficient solar power into your home.

Take GoSun Grill, a solar barbecue that debuted at CES this year. The grill can fry, bake or boil a meal for up to eight people sans fuel, using only energy from the sun. Solar panels in the grill transfer energy to heat pipes inside, and voilà! You have yourself an energy-efficient meal. The product is currently in production and will be available for $599 later this year.

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Future Home Tech: 8 Energy-Saving Solutions on the Horizon

Written By Paul Lester  http://www.energy.gov

Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs

From heating and cooling to electronics and appliances, it takes a lot of energy to power our daily lives. Our homes use 37 percent more energy today than they did in 1980. But without energy efficiency — through technology innovation and federal energy conservation standards — this number would be a lot higher. In fact, even though our total energy use has grown, our energy use per household is down about 10 percent, despite that our homes are larger and contain more devices.

Thanks to breakthroughs by our National Labs, industry and academia, equipment we use in our homes is more energy efficient than ever before, saving consumers money and slashing carbon pollution. Let’s take a look at a few technologies we can expect to see in the marketplace within the next few years that will make our homes even more sustainable.

1. SMARTER, MORE CONNECTED HOMES

We live in an increasingly connected world — the same is true for our homes. New electronic devices and appliances can now be linked to the Internet to provide real-time data that makes it easier to understand and lower energy use.

Soon these technologies will be more cost effective and smarter as a result of a project supported by the Energy Department’s Building Technologies Office. New wireless sensors developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will boost home energy efficiency through automated control systems for heating and cooling units, lighting and other systems that access data such as outside air and room temperature, humidity, light level and occupancy all at a fraction of a cost of typical wireless sensors you see on the market today. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory are also developing new protocols and standards that will improve how smart appliances communicate with each other and interact with the electric grid.

2. ULTRA-EFFICIENT HEAT PUMPS

The Building Technologies Office is ushering in the next generation of heat pump systems, which warm and cool your home by moving heat from one space to another. These include:

3. CARBON-FIGHTING CLOTHES DRYERS

The same concept behind heat pump technologies that keep your home comfortable can also be used for another important application: drying your clothes.  Oak Ridge National Laboratory and General Electric are developing a new type of clothes dryer that uses a heat pump cycle to generate hot air needed for drying. The result: a more efficient dryer that has the potential to lower energy consumption by 60 percent compared to conventional ones on the market today.

4. MAGNETIC REFRIGERATORS (THAT’S RIGHT, MAGNETS)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory and General Electric have teamed up to create a revolutionary new type of refrigerator that uses magnets to create cold, also known as the magnetocaloric effect (lowering or raising the temperature of material by changing the magnetic field).  For the past 100 years, refrigerators have relied on a process called vapor compression that uses coolants which can be harmful to the environment. The new refrigerator is a revolutionary technology that uses a water-based cooling fluid, making it better for the environment and more efficient, which means lower energy bills and less carbon pollution.

5. ADVANCED WINDOW CONTROLS

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Pella Windows are working on new highly insulated windows that use sensors and microprocessors to automatically adjust shading based on the amount of available sunlight and the time of day to ensure proper lighting and comfort, saving consumers energy and money.

6. NEXT-GEN INSULATION

Insulation is one of the most important ways to reduce your home heating and cooling costs. The Industrial Science & Technology Network is developing new foam insulation made with environmentally friendly and advanced composite materials that ensure heat doesn’t escape from the attic, walls and other areas of the home during cold winter months.

7. REFLECTIVE ROOFING MATERIALS

Cool roofs coated with materials containing specialized pigments reflect sunlight and absorb less heat than standard roofs. Expect these types of roof systems to get even “cooler” due to new fluorescent pigments developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and PPG Industries that can reflect nearly four times the amount of sunlight of standard pigments.

8. BRIGHTER, BETTER LIGHTING

LEDs (light emitting diodes) have come a long way, with today’s highest-performing lights consuming 85 percent less energy than incandescent bulbs. The Building Technologies Office’s Solid State Lighting Program supports research and development to lower the cost of LEDs, while making them even more efficient and long lasting. In fact, LED efficiency is expected to double from the current 125-135 lumens per watt to 230 lumens per watt in the next few years as result of continued R&D.

Go to buildings.energy.gov to learn how the Energy Department is advancing building technologies that improve the energy efficiency and comfort of American homes and businesses. Also, check out Energy Saver for more ways to save energy and money at home.

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Can You Trust Zillow’s Home Price Zestimate? In a Word: No.

WRITTEN BY JAYMI NACIRI

I got an email from Zillow last week. Seems my house has gone up in value another $2,000+ dollars in the past 30 days. And it’s going to rise another 3.5% in the next year, according to their Zestimate®. Fab!

Except that it’s just speculation. When it comes to Zillow’s Zestimates, you have to take the numbers with a grain of salt. Make that a big shake of salt, right over your shoulder. And maybe a stiff drink. And a frank conversation with your real estate agent.

“Shoppers, sellers and buyers routinely quote Zestimates to realty agents – and to one another – as gauges of market value,” said the Los Angeles Times. “If a house for sale has a Zestimate of $350,000, a buyer might challenge the sellers’ list price of $425,000. Or a seller might demand to know from potential listing brokers why they say a property should sell for just $595,000 when Zillow has it at $685,000. Disparities like these are daily occurrences and, in the words of one realty agent who posted on the industry blog ActiveRain, they are ‘the bane of my existence.'”

Are faulty Zillow estimates irritating, dangerous, somewhere in the middle? It all depends on your personal situation. A real estate investor, a seller in a high-end neighborhood, or an obsessive real estate watcher (ahem) may be able to brush off a $15,000 error. But for many people across the country, the word of Zillow might as well be the word of God. So, yeah, dangerous.

Price errors

Errors in sales prices are one of the issues Investopedia pointed outin its look at Zillow’s Zestimates.


spoty
 

“Zillow factors the date and price of the last sale into its estimate, and in some areas, these data make up a big part of the figure. If this information is inaccurate, it can throw off the Zestimate,” they said. “And since comparable sales also affect a home’s Zestimate, a mistake in one home’s sales price record can affect the Zestimates of other homes in the area. The Zestimate also takes into account actual property taxes paid, exceptions to tax assessments and other publicly available property tax data. Tax assessor’s property values can be inaccurate, though. The tax assessor’s database might have a mistake related to a property’s basic information, causing the assessed value to be too high or too low.”

In June, Zillow’s much-maligned (by industry experts, anyway) Zestimates got an upgrade with a new algorithm. Zillow CEO Spencer Rascoff has famously called his company’s price estimates, “a good starting point” and copped to a median error rate of approximately 8%. With their new algorithm, they say it’s dropped to 6.1%.


Marketwatch
 

John Wake, an economist and real estate agent from Real Estate Decoded, applied Zillow’s updated 6.1% margin of error to “Zillow’s own estimate of the median sale price in the U.S. in May 2016 of $229,737 and got a typical error of $14,000. He then took a sample city, Denver – a city in which estimates are actually more accurate than average” – and found “the error spread in 2016 is a lot tighter and more focused on the bullseye of the actual sales price,” but that “their Zestimates are scattershot.”

In his example, “a Denver home has a fair market value of $300,000. According to Zillow’s Zestimate Accuracy Table, 10% of their Zestimate prices were off by more than 20% from the actual sale prices. Half of that 10% are Zestimates that are too high by 20% or more, and half are Zestimates that are too low by 20% or more. That means you have a 5% chance Zillow will give you a Zestimate of $360,000 OR MORE, and a 5% chance Zillow will give you a Zestimate of $240,00 OR LESS. Yikes!”

Missing data

It gets even more complicated without all the data that gets fed into Zillow’s algorithm. Limit the available info and the margin for error grows.

That same email I received included a couple of new listings and info on recent sold homes in the area. Notice anything interesting about these recent sales?

Yep, no sales prices. Texas is one of about a dozen states without a mandatory price disclosure law, which makes property appraisals challenging and which makes it even more difficult for Zillow to come up with an accurate Zestimate since it eliminates one of their key data points.

In the case of my home, they’re a good $11,000–15,000 high on their sales price estimate. And that’s based on my direct knowledge of sales prices in my neighborhood—not list prices, not tax assessments, and not assumed sales prices based on trends.

Which brings up another issue that leads to inaccurate estimates. In many neighborhoods, sales trends and prices vary street to street. But Zillow’s estimates are a one-size-fits-all program. In my masterplan, the building of high-density units on the southern edge of the community a few years back took a bite out of the value of homes on the perimeter streets. Sales of homes with a first-floor master also get a bump here.

And then there’s the fact that this community is also split between two elementary schools. Zillow wouldn’t know which one buyers prefer and wouldn’t account for a difference in sales price between two otherwise comparable homes. But, people who live here would, and so would the local real estate agents.

Which only reinforces the importance of working with one, BTW.

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Spring Home Maintenance List: Five Things to Check Off Your List

WRITTEN BY REALTY TIMES STAFF

Spring Home Maintenance List: Five Things to Check Off Your List

Just as you prepare your home for the winter by covering outside pipes, making sure your heater is working well and removing all of the old leaves and branches from your property, there are also a number of things homeowners should do to ready their homes for warmer weather. With spring in full swing, check out the following list of home-related chores and checkups you may want to do before summer arrives:

Check For Pests

As plants, flowers and bushes began to come back to life with the warmer weather, so did a variety of pests. Every spring, walk the perimeter of your home checking for signs of infestations. Look for evidence of termites in the wood — either by seeing the insects with your own eyes or by seeing damage to the wood or their droppings; also watch for ant hills, bees swarming in trees and places where four-legged critters like squirrels and raccoons might be able to get into the attic. Do the same thing in the home; if you have spotted a cockroach in the bathroom or crickets in the kitchen, chances are good there are many more of the insects that you cannot see. If you spot a large number of bees building a hive, call a bee removal company that will safely relocate them, and if you see other evidence of pests you may want to call an exterminator for help — especially in the cases of termites and wild animals getting into the home.

Examine Your Sprinklers

You may not have run your underground sprinkler system all winter, but now that the weather is heating up you’ll want to be sure your grass and other outdoor plants are getting plenty of water. Turn on the sprinkler zone by zone and check to be sure the sprinkler heads are rising from the ground properly and spraying in the right direction. If you spot any that will not budge or have broken off and are shooting water into the air, you can call a local landscaper to come fix them, or DIY-minded folks can fix these themselves.

Examine the Roof

Another important task to complete in the spring is giving the roof a thorough check up. Depending on how pitched or large your roof is, and how comfortable you are with heights, you can carefully do this inspection yourself or hire a roofing company. If you do this job on your own, examine the roof shingles or tiles to see if any were damaged or blew off during the winter, and check the flashing around skylights and chimneys to be sure it is tight and not allowing water to seep into the house.

Ready Your Air Conditioner

Before it gets too hot, give your A/C unit a thorough inspection to be sure it will keep the home and your family cool during the upcoming warm months. Change the filter, check all hose connections for any leaks and make sure the drain pans are not clogged. Vacuum the unit to remove any dust that can prevent it from working at full efficiency, and if you spot any issues along the way, call in a professional to fix them before summer arrives.

Trim Away Overgrown Branches

As the DIY Network notes, spring is a great time to remove branches from trees and bushes that are touching up against your house. In general, try to keep the branches about 5 or 6 feet away from the sides and roof of the house to prevent critters from having a highway to hop onto your roof and prevent spring rains from getting onto the roof and sides of the home.

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Simple DIY Projects That Will Increase the Value of Your Home

WRITTEN BY DAMIEN JUSTUS

Simple DIY Projects That Will Increase the Value of Your Home

Looking to boost the value of your home without spending hundreds of thousands of dollars? You can! Making changes in certain rooms, like the kitchen and bathroom, is more beneficial than in others. These simple DIY projects will help increase your home’s value the most.

Modernize Fixtures

Replacing outlet covers can cost less than a dollar each, but if they have paint or other things on it, it’s a good change. While you’re at it, consider updating the outlets themselves. For about $25-$30 you can buy an outlet that also includes two USB charging ports. With all the smartphones, tablets and other electronic devices lying around, just a few of those, well-placed, can make a big difference. Think about the rooms in your home that don’t have enough outlets and the rooms that are most used for charging.

A less expensive upgrade? Doorknobs. Mismatched, broken, and dingy doorknobs can be a major deterrent. For a small amount of money per knob, you can update the look and make the whole house more visually appealing.

Lighten It Up

The more light you can add to your home, the better. Freshening up or removing curtains can brighten your home and make it more inviting.

Replacing windows is also a great way to add value to your home, particularly true if you live in an older home that has a lot of windows that stick or that let in the heat or cold. Installing energy efficient windows can also get you a nice tax break. However, poorly-installed windows can let in water, which can lead to mold and cracked foundations, so this isn’t for everyone.

Old light fixtures, or light fixtures that are dim or unappealing should be replaced to brighten the house.

Makeover the Bathroom

Bathrooms consistently get a high return on the investment. If you have a small budget and you’re DIYing, start small. A new vanity. New sink. A nice ceiling light. A spa-like shower head. A nice towel bar. None of these things have to cost over $100, but they all add value to your home by freshening it up, providing simple conveniences, and making it nicer. Who doesn’t want one of those fancy shower heads?

If your bathroom floor is falling apart, suffering from water damage or is just outdated, you can restore it yourself pretty inexpensively. Many home improvement stores offer a class so you can learn what you don’t know, which might enable you to choose a more expensive flooring. Stick with a neutral shade to add the most value.

Freshen Up the Kitchen

The kitchen is one of the biggest things that will turn potential buyers on or off to a house. It’s also one of the places where you can get the most money back for your investment. What’s the single best DIY change to make in the kitchen? A fresh coat of white paint on the cabinets. Go ahead and change out the knobs, too.

Storage is another change to consider. Add more shelves, possibly with space underneath to hang coffee mugs. Kitchen islands are in demand now and building one with storage will add value.

Keeping Up on Maintenance

A home in good repair is always going to be more valuable than one with a leaky roof. If the siding is old or falling apart, replace it. Consider getting a home warranty, to ensure the value of your appliances. Also make sure to maintain the appearance outside, sweep up the leaves, trim the bushes, and keep fences in good repair.

Adding value to your home doesn’t have to be expensive or difficult. Sometimes, the simplest DIY can be the best place to start. Start by considering your budget and your home’s most pressing needs, and update from there.

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Chic Small Space Solutions That Bring Big Impact

WRITTEN BY JAYMI NACIRI

Chic Small Space Solutions That Bring Big Impact

Size doesn’t always matter. Your small space doesn’t have to suffer just because you don’t have thousands of square feet to deck out. Perhaps it’s an outgrowth of the tiny home movement or perhaps it’s the fact that retailers have gotten smarter about the fact that not every living area can accommodate a grand piano and a couch that seats 20, but there are more chic small-space solutions now than ever before.

You can use a few tips and tricks and some products that have been specifically designed for smaller spaces to create a home that lives large, no matter the size.

It’s all about the scale

Overwhelming your space with furniture that’s too large – or too much of it – will only make it look smaller. “Like Goldie Locks looking for the right bed, one was too big, one too small, and finally one was just right, furniture needs to be just right in a small room,” said Freshome. “A large couch in a small area can overtake the space, while a small couch will seem dwarfed.” Search for “apartment-sized” furniture for right-sized pieces that don’t scrimp on style.

Pottery Barn is on board with the trend. “Their new small space collection was designed to be ‘size-conscious and multifunctional,’ with accessible price points,” said Sunset. The SoMa upholstered sofa “easily folds out for any visitor. It’s comfortable to lounge on during TV binges, too – there’s a double layer of padding that you won’t find on some basic sleepers.”

No eating area? Build it in

You can never go wrong with a banquette. It’s one of our favorite features in a kitchen, and is especially useful in a small space where you need to find a creative way to tuck in an eating area. Look at how charming this banquette is, and it takes up almost no space. For extra functionality, make sure your banquette seats have storage inside.

Reflect… on your backsplash

A few strategically placed mirrors can help bounce light around the room and make spaces look larger, so why not bring them into the kitchen? This mirrored wall greatly expands the visual idea of the kitchen without increasing the square footage.

Create a jewel box in the bathroom

This bathroom may be small, but it lacks for nothing when it comes to style. It’s hard not to be gorgeous with Calacatta marble, but the Waterworks vanity and modern fixtures complete the look. Notice how the open vanity keeps the eye moving, creating the idea of space even though there isn’t much.

Pay attention to color

Conventional rules say to go with light colors in a small room, and that remains the easiest way to keep a petite space from feeling confined. However, “dark hues can work their own type of magic in small places, and more often than not the result is dead classy and much harder to get wrong, said Apartment Therapy. “Rooms lacking architectural character, especially tiny ones… can gain a few style points from a dramatic, deep hue on the walls. A dark color establishes an elegant backdrop that allows you to go as spare on the accessories as you see fit.”


Designsponge.com
 Don’t Be Afraid of Patterns

You may be afraid of overwhelming your small space with too much pattern, but carefully chosen spots can make the space feel luxe. “Are you crazy for color? A great way to add interest while still maintaining an airy, open look is to paint three walls a light hue and choose a fun wallpaper for a single accent wall,” said HGTV.


HGTV.com
 

A clever use of stripes can also “trick the eye,” they said. Have a narrow space? Go horizontal. If it’s low ceilings you’re dealing with, this a great way to pull the eye up and make the space feel larger and/or accentuate ceiling detail or a snazzy light fixture.


messagenote.com
 

Think smart storage

Finding places to put stuff seems to be a universal challenge, but it may be more difficult in a compact space. Items that do double duty, like these ottomans that open up to reveal storage inside, or these ingenious stairs, can make a small space infinitely more livable.

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